October 21, 2004

Contagious

It would appear that my daughter has accidentally figured something out. It seems that the leg warmer pattern in Knit Wit is a corrupting force that can be used to draw young girls helplessly into knitting. They cannot resist, flailing uselessly against the combined force of Meg and the book.

It began like this. I brought home my copy of Amy Singers book. It disappeared and has not been seen since, though 4 complete pairs of leg warmers have turned up. The first pair was desperately wonky, as Meg complained that she "didn't understand your knitting language!" A quick talk about reading a pattern and the next pair were much better. (Meg is a child of my heart. She considers patterns interesting, but not essential. She made several changes for *style*)

firstlegs

Sorry, a little aside. Meg missed an entire instruction in the book because she is a child of the internet. She thought that this " Turning row : P " was a title, followed by an emoticon of a person sticking their tongue out. She skipped it. I laughed for an hour

By the time she had finished the second pair and worn them to school, the other girls were screaming for them. Meg began to desperately knit faster and faster, using up her meagre stash (Yes, she has her own stash. You didn't think I gave the girls my yarn, did you?) turning out a pair of leg warmers every evening. One pair went to Meg's best friend Maddy...

legwarmer

Who found a novel use for them when it got cold...

maddyhat

Maddy asked for a second pair (perhaps because she had realized the powerful multi-use ability of the leg warmer) and Megan, up to her armpits in leg-warmer begging, turned her down cold. There began a period of bitter negotiation which ended last night, with this.

maddyknits

I think I need another copy of the book.

I finished the (hopefully) stripy yarn last night...though I must have been out of my mind when I thought that one bag was enough. It produced about 100m of yarn, which falls short of my minimum sock length by a bit. (Ok. Fine. A lot. It falls short by a lot. I was trying to be an optimist. It's half of what I need. I was drunk on yarn at Rhinebeck and don't know what I was thinking. The bag was in ounces. ) Ideas? Contrasting heel, cuff, toe? Socks for a small person? Crap. I can't believe I've been knitting this long and can still suffer yarn delusions.

cpsocks

I am comforting myself with some awesome mail. Emma sent me some tips on top down short-row sleeves (such a good idea) and tucked some very, very yummy sock yarn in with it. Thanks Emma!

coffeeyarn

Allyson sent provisions for the Sewing-up Party (to be held here November 7th for Mason-Dixon Knitting, don't forget to come. Email for directions, then see if the Nashville one is closer to you.)
I know I'd rather have Allyson here than coffee...but I'll save it for that day, and ceremoniously open it in a grand toast to the generous Allyson, who clearly understands me.

I enjoyed a little more of the Rhinebeck spoils last night and thought about beginning the pleasant job of washing the samples of Southdown fleece that Liz and Gussie brought me. They had read my article in Spin off about my Great-Grandfather Archibald Stewart and wondered if they could use my photo of him on their website. They gave me this southdown fleece when they saw me at Rhinebeck. I'm so touched by their kindness.

southdown

I did play with my dye kit from Countrywool last night but the last instruction is "put in sun to dry" and Toronto is a joyless gray damp place right now. It would help if I would turn on the heat, but that would be giving up. My brother and sister have taken to calling me daily to ask if my heat is on. Toronto temperatures? Let's see who blinks first.

Posted by Stephanie at October 21, 2004 12:42 PM